WellSpring

Repurposing our streets for physical activity: The Open Streets Model

From Bogota, Columbia, to Thunder Bay, Ontario, Open Streets provides communities with the opportunity to be active on the streets. Open Streets are free recreation programs that temporarily closes the streets to traffic and open them to people to walk, bike, and just be physically. People can engage with their local community and businesses, as well as learn more about community amenities and programs. Author: Alyssa Bird (WellSpring | August 2016, Volume 27, Number 8)

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Are Canadian kids too tired to move? The 2016 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

The 2016 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth introduces the important inter-relationships among physical activity, sedentary behaviours and sleep, and for the first time, assigns a grade to sleep. As part of a whole-day approach, the new Canadian 24-hour movement guidelines recommend that children and youth need to “Sweat, Step, Sleep and Sit” in the right amounts. Key recommendations for parents/families, schools, and governments/policy-makers are provided to help kids sit less, move more, and sleep better. Authors: Mark S. Tremblay, Joel Barnes, Allana LeBlanc, Katherine Janson (WellSpring | July 2016, Volume 27, Number 7)

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Reach, twirl, curl up small! Exploring physical literacy in the early years

Physical activity in the early years (0–5 years) is an important factor for children's development, both physically and mentally. Developing physical literacy in the early years should be child-centered and most importantly, fun. This article highlights the importance of physical literacy and introduces the Calgary Be Fit For Life resources to support parents and childcare workers develop physical literacy in young children. Author: Leah Yardley (WellSpring | June 2016, Volume 27, Number 6)

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Fitting it in: How being new to Canada influences physical activity

Overall, transitioning to Canadian life influenced participation in physical activity through family, social relationships, costs of being active and the cold Canadian climate. Implications for practice and policy are suggested, including enhanced community engagement and organizational modifications. Authors: Kimberley Curtin, Christina Loitz, Nancy Spencer-Cavaliere, Ernest Khalema (WellSpring | May 2016, Volume 27, Number 5)

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Let’s get social! Using social media to build and maintain active living communities

Social media is unique from these forms of communication, as it has the potential to reach a larger audience, allows for two-way communication and fosters brand personality, awareness and recognition. This article will provide an overview of factors to consider when using social media to promote active living and build communities in the field. Author: Christina Loitz (WellSpring | April 2016, Volume 27, Number 4)

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Sweat is the best antidepressant: But where do we go from here?

Physical activity can prevent and treat mental illness, as well as improve overall well-being. The exact dose-response relationship between physical activity and depression is unclear. Although following the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines seem to be an appropriate amount for the prevention of depression. Health professionals have an important role to play in establishing inter-professional collaboration to move forward the use of physical activity for prevention and treatment. Author: Guy Faulkner (WellSpring | March 2016, Volume 27, Number 3)

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Move your body. Move your mood.

Physical activity is an essential part of the development of healthy youth and supports the maintenance of psychological wellbeing. This article shares the findings and recommendations from the Alberta-based Move Your Mood physical activity program for youth seeking mental health support. Author: Denise Fredeen (WellSpring | February 2016, Volume 27, Number 2)

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Physical activity and tobacco: Let's join forces!

Physical activity and healthy eating are often targeted as the key health behaviours in programming for healthy living. Tobacco use is rarely discussed in physical activity programming. Find Your Stride is a new learn to walk/run program for individuals who use tobacco or have recently quit. This article provides some rationale and information about incorporating tobacco reduction promotion in healthy living programming. Author: Angela Torry (WellSpring | January 2016, Volume 27, Number 1)

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What grandparents, parents, and kids say about play!

The experiences and perceptions of children’s active free play has changed over the generations. This article describes finds from inter-generational interviews and provides some suggestions on how to facilitate active free play today. Authors: Kacey C. Neely, Meghan Ingstrup, Shannon Pynn, Nicholas L. Holt (WellSpring | December 2015, Volume 26, Number 9)

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Standing up to sedentary behaviour

Sedentary behaviour and physical inactivity are two separate public health issues. Practitioners should speak with their clients about both negative health behaviours. This article includes strategies for facilitating conversations with clients and decision-makers. Author: Andrew McCloskey (WellSpring | November 2015, Volume 26, Number 8)

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