Our Work

The Alberta Survey on Physical Activity, the annual Physical Activity Forum, and a body of original resources and publications represent important aspects of the Centre's work.

2011 Physical Activity Forum

Motivating Physical Activity Behaviour: How do we separate fact from fiction?

This dynamic and timely presentation provided insights to practitioners about major developments in the field of human motivation, as applied to physical activity behaviour.

Key focus points included:

  • Defining human motivation and distinguishing between various forms of motivation.
  • Motivation as an important factor in promotion of physical activity.
  • How to distinguish between “optimal” vs. “troublesome” motives for physical activity.
  • Identifying key factors that permit motivation to flourish (or wither).
  • Strategies to enhance or sustain motivation towards physical activity.

Video of the 2011 Physical Activity Forum

You can view the Edmonton presentation on our YouTube channel.

Motivating Physical Activity Behaviour (52 minutes)

Panel discussion in Edmonton

This year, our panellists were:

  • Bettyann Petruk, Health Promotion Facilitator, Alberta Health Services
  • Pat Sachse-Brown, Principal, Belmead Elementary School and part of APPLE Schools Project
  • Lisa Workman, Exercise Specialist, Edmonton Oliver Primary Care Network

The Alberta Centre for Active Living and Mount Royal University proudly co-sponsored this important half-day Physical Activity Forum in Edmonton and Calgary.


Speaker Dr. Philip M. Wilson

Dr. Phil Wilson is recognized as a leading researcher in the field of human motivation and health-related behaviours. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Education and Kinesiology at Brock University (St. Catharines, Ontario). He is the co-founder and current co-director of the Behavioural Health Sciences Research Lab (BHSRL) at Brock University.

Dr. Wilson obtained his doctoral degree in Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta in 2003. In 1996, he earned a Master of Science degree in Physical Education and Exercise Science (University of North Dakota, 1996), preceded by a Bachelor of Science degree in Leisure Studies (University of North Carolina Greensboro, 1994).

Among other professional undertakings, Dr. Wilson is a synapse mentor with the Canadian Institute of Health Research, an adjunct faculty member with the Department of Kinesiology (McMaster University) and an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology and the American Journal of Health Behavior.