Our Work

The Alberta Survey on Physical Activity, the annual Physical Activity Forum, and a body of original resources and publications represent important aspects of the Centre's work.

2014 Physical Activity Forum

Get Up, Stand Up: A public health perspective on sedentary behaviour

Dr. John C. Spence, Professor and Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation, University of Alberta

A growing body of research is accumulating on the topic of sedentary behaviour. Some recent evidence suggests that the health effects of this behaviour may be independent of physical activity. The implications of such findings could present some challenges to the standard physical activity health promotion campaigns and initiatives. In this presentation, Dr. Spence clarified some definitional issues, described the determinants of sedentary behaviour, and engaged the audience in helping to identify potential interventions/solutions.

Post-Forum Resources
Highlights sheet of Get Up, Stand Up (key points)Highlights sheet of Get Up, Stand Up presentation (key points)

4 pages, PDF

Reference list of articles mentioned at Get Up, Stand Up
Reference list of articles mentioned in Get Up, Stand Up

1 page, PDF

Video of Get Up, Stand Up in Edmonton
YouTube video of Get Up, Stand Up presentation in Edmonton
63 minutes, YouTube video
Speaker Dr. Spence's slides
Speaker Dr. Spence's slides
44 slides, PDF

The Alberta Centre for Active Living was proud to sponsor this important half-day Physical Activity Forum in Edmonton and Calgary in May 2014.

Speaker: Dr. John C. Spence

Dr. John C. Spence spends most of his time relaxing in the Sedentary Living Laboratory in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta. He has expertise in the area of behavioural medicine and research methods. His research focuses on both the benefits and determinants of physical activity and how physical inactivity is related to obesity. Dr. Spence has studied the broad social determinants (e.g., SES) and population physical activity patterns.

More recently, Dr. Spence has focused on the physical environment and how it may influence physical activity choices and risk for obesity among both children and adults (e.g., urban form, location of food establishments).

Dr. Spence has a strong background in physical activity measurement, meta-analysis, and ecological models of behaviour and health. His work is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada (HSFC), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), and the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR). He has also served as a member of grant review panels for CIHR (Psychosocial, Sociocultural, and Behavioural Determinants of Health Committee), HSFC (Committee 7), and National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Dr. Spence is also a Senior Research Associate with the Alberta Centre for Active Living (ACAL), an Adjunct Researcher with the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute (CFLRI), and serves on advisory committees for Active Healthy Kids Canada and ParticipACTION.